Lawton Real Estate, Inc



Posted by Lawton Real Estate, Inc on 7/2/2020

Photo by Maksim Shutov on Unsplash

Building a storage shed for wood can be advantageous for several reasons: it allows you to store your firewood properly.  When firewood is dry, your fire will be warmer, smoke far less, and you'll burn less wood at a time -- and a shed with good airflow that is slightly elevated will ensure your firewood stays dry.  Not to mention that a storage shed will ensure your woodpile is neat and tidy!

This set of instructions will produce a woodshed capable of holding about one cord of wood.

Materials

Lumber

  • Three 4" x 4" x 12' 
  • Two 2" x 6" x 8'
  • Eight 2" x 4" x 8'
  • Thirteen 1" x 4" x 8'
  • One 4' x 8' x 19/32" plywood (OSB or CDX; see notes below) 
  • Hardware

  • Twelve 1/4" x 5" hex lag screws
  • One, 1-lb. box of 1 1/2" T25 deck screws
  • One, 1-lb box of 3" T25 deck screws
  • Other

  • One 5-Gal. bucket of rubber roof
  • Six 12" x 8" x 12" deck blocks
  • Directions

    If you have the opportunity to get your wood cut at the hardware store, this is a great time-saver.  If not, start by measuring out and cutting your wood down to what is described in the sections below.

    Make the floor frame

  • The 2" x 6" by 8' lumber will form the front and back of your woodshed; the 2" x 4" x 45" will form the sides.  Attach these together with the 3" deck screws, using two screws at each join.
  • Next, take five pieces of 2" x 4" x 4' lumber and place these equidistant atop the frame to make the joists.  Be sure to line up your first and last joists so that they are flush with the front and back of the frame.  Fix these in place using two, 3" deck screws on both sides of every joist, for a total of 20 deck screws on the five joists.  Set the remaining three joists aside.
  • Set the floor frame up off the ground either using the deck blocks or two pieces of lumber.  This will ensure you can attach your 4 x 4 posts extending slightly below your frame.
  • The posts at the back of your shed should measure 4' x 4' x 5' 6", and your front-facing posts should measure 4' x 4' x 6'.  There should be six posts total, three for each side.  Attach your posts to the inside corners of your frame and one additional post at the midpoint of your two longest sides.  Use 3" screws to hold your posts in place while you work on the rest of the shed.  Be sure that your posts extend 3 1/2" below your frame.
  • Add your remaining joists snug around your posts, such that there is a joist on either side.  Secure with 3" deck screws as you did in #2.
  • Fix your posts into place permanently into the 2" x 6" x 8' floor frame using 1/4" x 5" lag screws, two facing outward, two facing inward.  You should use four lag screws on each post.
  • Take your 1" x 4" x 8' lumber and orient it at right angles to your joists.  Fix in place using two, 1 1/2" deck screws at each end of every floor joist wherever they touch.
  • Make the walls

  • Use 1" x 4" x 89" lumber to form the back slats of the storage shed.  Attach these equidistant along the outside of the back wall using two, 1 1/2" deck screws wherever the slats touch the frame.
  • Use 1" x 4" x 45" lumber to form the side slats of the storage shed.  Attach as you did the back slats in #1.
  • Set your frame on the deck blocks, concrete blocks or stones you have set aside for this purpose and adjust the shed to sit in its final, desired position.
  • Make the roof

  • Attach 2" x 4" x 4' lumber to both sides of the tops of your posts using two, 3" deck screws everywhere your lumber touches a post.  Your rafters should slant at approximately a 25-degree angle when you align your lumber with your taller and shorter posts.
  • Place the 4' x 8' x 1/2" plywood atop the roof joists.  Secure with 1 1/2" deck screws every half-foot everywhere your roof touches a rafter.  Note: CDX plywood may produce a longer-lasting roof that is less likely to bow, while OSB is fine for flooring. 
  • Apply rubber roof, following the manufacturer's instructions closely.  If desired, add roofing material to extend the life of your woodshed.

  • This entire woodshed costs less than $250 to build and will take one afternoon's work for two people, whereas a pre-made woodshed can cost $1,000 or more.  If you can use leftovers from other projects, it can cost even less!  Ensure yourself a cozy winter with this one-weekend DIY.




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    Posted by Lawton Real Estate, Inc on 6/18/2020


     Photo by Ben Thijssen via Pixabay

    If you're like many modern homeowners, your ideal of an ideal outdoor living space is one that serves as a personal oasis. Perhaps you've cultivated a thriving culinary herb garden complete with classically inspired statuary or maybe you've carved out a serene space in the middle of a flowering thicket. Whatever type of sanctuary you've created in your outdoor living space, you probably want to be able to enjoy it as often as possible, and there may be nights when you find yourself reluctantly heading indoors as the sun sinks below the horizon. However, with the right type of outdoor lighting, you can relax or entertain in your outdoor living space no matter what the time of day. Following are just three ways to light up your night:

    Water Feature Lights

    If you've got waterfalls, fountains or ponds in your outdoor living space, consider using lighting to add a dramatic effect. Backlighting works well on waterfalls and fountains, and in-ground lighting highlights and defines ponds. If you're lucky enough to have a stream running through your property, you can place solar lights on the bank for added visibility. 

    Walkway Lights

    Walkways of all types, from winding garden paths to basic concrete walks leading up to your front door can benefit from ground-level lighting. Walkway lights increase aesthetics as well as provides a layer of protection against slip-and-fall accidents, making them ideal if you like to do a lot of outdoor entertaining. 

    Another lighting option when you want visibility on walkways or other ground-level spaces is downlighting from posts placed alongside the walkway. This is a great option when you want the area to be extremely well-lit at night. 

    Specimen Plant Lights

    Specimen plant lights showcase individual trees and shrubs that feature particular visual interest. Monkey puzzle trees, for instance, make good choices because of their unusual appearance. You might also choose to have specimen lighting options installed for the purpose of backlighting your favorite flowering shrubs. Specimen plant lighting is also instrumental for those who want to create architectural balance after dark. For instance, if you've got two tall arborvitaes flanking your front entryway, specimen lighting backlighting each one provides a classically elegant appeal. 

    Overhead Fairy Lights

    If midsummer soirees are a part of your seasonal entertaining agenda, consider bringing an ethereal accent to the picture by stringing fairy lights in tree branches. You can also use them on hardscaping features such as gazebos, railings, pergolas and arbors. 

    Whether your favorite after dark activity in your outdoor living space is enjoying an al fresco dinner party with friends or soaking up the serenity in the company of a good book, outdoor lighting helps enhance the experience. 




    Tags: lighting   DIY   outdoor living  
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    Posted by Lawton Real Estate, Inc on 1/9/2020


    Give new life to outdoor tabletops using concrete or tile - and liven up one of the most important parts of your home, your porch or patio. It is surprisingly easy to make over an existing table; in some cases, the base of a table remains in excellent shape, while the horizontal surface ages more swiftly. A tile or concrete finish allows you to use what you already have and to make a custom piece you'll enjoy for years to come. While every project is different, the details below will help you get started with a concrete or tile makeover. 

    Tile vs. Concrete - What's the Difference? 

    Tile and concrete will have the same basic costs and take the same amount of time to complete. The differences lie in the look of the final results; you may prefer the look of a single, impressive slab or an artistic, tile mosaic, or another version that may better fit your home. The final consideration is tools and experience. If you've already laid tile in a bathroom or kitchen, or have a tile saw and tools, then tile may be the right fit for your makeover. If you've made concrete stepping stones and other pieces for the yard, then you might be more comfortable with this material instead. 

    Refinishing a Tabletop with Tile

    Make sure your tabletop is in decent shape and that there are not any large gaps or large areas of damage. Measure your tabletop and sketch out a design.  You can create an artistic rendering, a geometric pattern or simply place the tile in a line. Planning things out first ensures you know how much to buy and what to cut. For tables, the pre-cut pieces designed for borders and trim often work well, so a trip to the DIY store can help you determine more about your needs and preferences. 

    Choose Your Tile & Gather Supplies

    You'll need a tile adhesive rated for outdoor use to secure the tiles. Layout the tiles on the table before securing to check the fit and look of your chosen design. When you are happy, glue the pieces into place with the adhesive. Work in small areas and allow the glue to set for at least 24 hours (cover the table with plastic if needed). 

    Fill in the gaps between tiles with mortar rated for outdoor use, and allow to dry at least 48 hours before using the table. 

    Refinishing a Tabletop with Concrete

    Concrete's smooth surface comes from being poured, so you'll need to prepare the table before you mix anything. Your table should be clean, dry and clear of any defects, though the concrete will fill in small holes and hide minor blemishes. 

    Create an edge around the table using a product made for concrete. This temporary barrier will be removed at a later date, but will keep the concrete in place as it dries. You can find flexible edging designed for this purpose at a DIY store. 

    Mix the concrete as indicated on the package, then pour or scoop onto the table, smoothing it out with a trowel as you go. Once the concrete begins to set, you can make any impressions or patterns you like, or simply let it dry and harden. Do not remove the edges until the concrete is fully dried. 

    48 hours later, remove the edging and sand or touch up the table, then enjoy.

    Concrete or tile? The choice is yours -- either of these finishes will add years to the life of your table and ensure you create a piece that is uniquely yours. Allow yourself a weekend to tackle this project and wait for a sunny, comfortable day, as most parts need to be completed in place outdoors. 

     




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